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29

Jul

larissafae:

carryonmywaywardstirrup:

endmerit:

Remember that time Daleks and Cybermen had sass-off?

THIS IS LITERALLY MY FAVE SCENE FROM DOCTOR WHO EVER I AM NOT EVEN JOKING I AM SO GLAD SOMEONE MADE A POST OF IT I THINK ABOUT THIS MORE OFTEN THAN IS NORMAL UGH IT MAKES ME SO HAPPY

No one sasses better than the Daleks and Cybermen. No one.

image

yayasmeen:

piforeverzzzzaaaaaaaa:

classytragedy:

maleeshda3wa:

yayasmeen:

I think my selfie problem is getting out of hand..

This deserves at least a thousand notes !!

This is beautiful

Out of your hand and into the heart of hundreds 😂

More like thousands, I’m even getting marriage proposals on here now 😂😭

when you’re going through your blog trying to find *that thing that’s been in the back of your mind and I just gotta find it RIGHT NOW* and then you find it and you’re like HELL YEA MOFO I FOUND IT COOKIE FOR ME and then you go on about your normal business, reblogging and liking shit, until you realize

I’m still on my blog 

yeahwriters:

tennants-hair:

hipsterinatardis:

l0rdofthepeasants:

twofingerswhiskey:

ifellforloki:

teenage-dirntbag:

casismyfavoritecolor:

sheepies:

casismyfavoritecolor:

sheepies:

(american voice) hairy padder

is that how we sound omfg

yes

(british voice) ‘arry pouhta 

(australian voice) hay putta

(filipino voice) hari paterr

(canadian voice) hairee pawterr

(arab voice) heerry bootar

(malfoy voice) POTTER!

(dumbledore voice) HARRY DIDJA PUT YA NAME IN DA GOBLET OF FIYAH

Forever reblog ahahaha

truebluemeandyou:

truebluemeandyou: How to Answer the Top 35 Asked Interview Questions. This has become one of my top posts and I’m reblogging it for all the recent grads out there.

How to Answer the Top 35 Asked Interview Questions from The Undercover Recruiter here. Posted for friends looking for jobs this summer. Unfortunately you may also be asked illegal questions and these are two pretty good articles here and here.

A thought experiment: Imagine how people might react if Taylor Swift released an album made up entirely of songs about wishing she could get back together with one of her exes.

We’d hear things like: “She can’t let go. She’s clingy. She’s irrational. She’s crazy.” Men would have a field day comparing her to their own “crazy” exes.

Yet when Robin Thicke released “Paula” – a plea for reconciliation with his ex-wife Paula Patton disguised as an LP — he was called incoherent, obsessed, heartfelt and, in particular, creepy.

But you didn’t hear men calling him “crazy” — even though he used it as the title of one of tracks.

No, “crazy” is typically held in reserve for women’s behavior. Men might be obsessed, driven, confused or upset. But we don’t get called “crazy” — at least not the way men reflexively label women as such.

“Crazy” is one of the five deadly words guys use to shame women into compliance. The others: Fat. Ugly. Slutty. Bitchy. They sum up the supposedly worst things a woman can be.

WHAT WE REALLY MEAN BY “CRAZY” IS: “SHE WAS UPSET, AND I DIDN’T WANT HER TO BE.”

“Crazy” is such a convenient word for men, perpetuating our sense of superiority. Men are logical; women are emotional. Emotion is the antithesis of logic. When women are too emotional, we say they are being irrational. Crazy. Wrong.

Women hear it all the time from men. “You’re overreacting,” we tell them. “Don’t worry about it so much, you’re over-thinking it.” “Don’t be so sensitive.” “Don’t be crazy.” It’s a form of gaslighting — telling women that their feelings are just wrong, that they don’t have the right to feel the way that they do. Minimizing somebody else’s feelings is a way of controlling them. If they no longer trust their own feelings and instincts, they come to rely on someone else to tell them how they’re supposed to feel.

Small wonder that abusers love to use this c-word. It’s a way of delegitimizing a woman’s authority over her own life.

Most men (#notallmen, #irony) aren’t abusers, but far too many of us reflexively call women crazy without thinking about it. We talk about how “crazy girl sex” is the best sex while we also warn men “don’t stick it in the crazy.” How I Met Your Mother warned us to watch out for “the crazy eyes” and how to process women on the “Crazy/Hot” scale. When we talk about why we broke up with our exes, we say, “She got crazy,” and our guy friends nod sagely, as if that explains everything.


Except what we’re really saying is: “She was upset, and I didn’t want her to be.”

Many men are socialized to be disconnected from our emotions — the only manly feelings we’re supposed to show are stoic silence or anger. We’re taught that to be emotional is to be feminine. As a result, we barely have a handle on our own emotions — meaning that we’re especially ill-equipped at dealing with someone else’s.

That’s where “crazy” comes in. It’s the all-purpose argument ender. Your girlfriend is upset that you didn’t call when you were going to be late? She’s being irrational. She wants you to spend time with her instead of out with the guys again? She’s being clingy. Your wife doesn’t like the long hours you’re spending with your attractive co-worker? She’s being oversensitive.

As soon as the “crazy” card is in play, women are put on the defensive. It derails the discussion from what she’s saying to how she’s saying it. We insist that someone can’t be emotional and rational at the same time, so she has to prove that she’s not being irrational. Anything she says to the contrary can just be used as evidence against her.

More often than not, I suspect, most men don’t realize what we’re saying when we call a woman crazy. Not only does it stigmatize people who have legitimate mental health issues, but it tells women that they don’t understand their own emotions, that their very real concerns and issues are secondary to men’s comfort. And it absolves men from having to take responsibility for how we make others feel.

In the professional world, we’ve had debates over labels like “bossy” and “brusque,” so often used to describe women, not men. In our interpersonal relationships and conversations, “crazy” is the adjective that needs to go.

Men really need to stop calling women crazy - Harris O’Malley  (via quentintortellini)

(Source: Washington Post)

thtwhitegurrl:

slutdust:

I bought my friend an elephant for their room.

They said “Thank you.”

I said “Don’t mention it.”

Is there a joke here that 15 thousand people get but I don’t?

awesometastical101:

todallison:

this vine is better than all of paranormal activity

I just noticed that that guy in the button up starts licking the guy’s shoulder on the couch.

(Source: vinebox)

Dylan O’Brien accepting Breakthrough Actor at the 2014 Young Hollywood Awards

(Source: makos-lightningrod)

Ancient moon priestesses were called virgins. ‘Virgin’ meant not married, not belonging to a man - a woman who was ‘one-in-herself’. The very word derives from a Latin root meaning strength, force, skill; and was later applied to men: virle. Ishtar, Diana, Astarte, Isis were all all called virgin, which did not refer to sexual chastity, but sexual independence. And all great culture heroes of the past, mythic or historic, were said to be born of virgin mothers: Marduk, Gilgamesh, Buddha, Osiris, Dionysus, Genghis Khan, Jesus - they were all affirmed as sons of the Great Mother, of the Original One, their worldly power deriving from her. When the Hebrews used the word, and in the original Aramaic, it meant ‘maiden’ or ‘young woman’, with no connotations to sexual chastity. But later Christian translators could not conceive of the ‘Virgin Mary’ as a woman of independent sexuality, needless to say; they distorted the meaning into sexually pure, chaste, never touched.

Monica Sjoo, The Great Cosmic Mother: Rediscovering the Religion of the Earth  (via thewaking)

Literally the most important thing you will read today.

(via aesrettibeht)

#staywoke

(via diokpara)

(Source: ynannarising)